Get Involved

Join the Campaign

You can help by sending a message to your MP urging a public review of Canada post or you can download and print a hard copy.

You can also send a message in support of postal banking or you can download and print a hard copy

Need to keep up-to-date on the campaign? Sign up for the campaign newsletter below.

Talk to your family and friends about what the public postal service means to you and why a public review and postal banking are important. You can find additional resources below to help.

Sharing this site and your actions on social media is another way to mobilize more people.

Thank you for your support!

More ways to get involved

Is your city or municipality on the list of postal banking supporters on this website? If not, would you meet with your municipal representative and encourage them to move a resolution, either in support of postal banking or a public review of Canada Post?

Can your help organize an event or information session in your community?

We can give you resources to help.

You can also volunteer to help a nearby CUPW local in their campaign activities.

Please connect with a Save Canada Post campaign coordinator at savecanadapost@cupw-sttp.org or call 1-855-878-7111.

Please feel free to post and share content from this website using the embedded share tools. Post and send us pictures of your involvement, too, using the hashtag #savecanadapost to make sure postal workers will see your support!

Together we can build a successful 21st century post office that meets the needs of Canadians and creates new revenue streams, such as postal banking. We appreciate every bit of support.




Resources

Send your MP a message in support of Postal Banking

Date: 
Wednesday November 25 2015

Canada needs a postal bank. Thousands of rural towns and villages in our country do not have a bank, but many of them have a post office that could provide financial services. As well, nearly two million Canadians desperately need an alternative to payday lenders. A postal bank could be that alternative.

Postal banks already exist in many parts of the world.  They are used to:

  • increase financial inclusion
  • fund economic development
  • and generate revenue to preserve public postal service and jobs

Our post office used to have a national saving bank up until 1968 - and there is no reason we shouldn’t have one today.  

A bank for everyone – Support postal banking

Send your MP a message with our online form or download and print the PDF version of the letter below. You can find your MP here: www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/compilations/houseofcommons/memberbypostalcode.aspx

Send your MP a message urging a public review of Canada Post

Date: 
Tuesday November 17 2015

On December 11, 2013, Canada Post announced drastic cutbacks to our public postal service, including plans to end home mail delivery in our country.

Shortly after the Liberals won the 2015 federal election, Canada Post announced it would “temporarily” suspend the delivery cuts. It made this move because the Liberals had promised, during the election, to halt the delivery cuts and conduct a review of Canada Post.

A temporary suspension isn’t good enough.

 

Help us build a better Canada Post – A Canada Post for everyone! 

Send your MP a message with our online form or download and print the PDF version of the letter below. You can find your MP here: www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/compilations/houseofcommons/memberbypostalcode.aspx

Postal Privatization and Deregulation - Questions and Answers

Date: 
Friday January 30 2015

PRIVATIZATION

What does privatizing a post office mean?

Privatisation means selling a public post office to the private sector by selling shares to private investors. Once shares are sold to anyone - even employees - a post office is under pressure to make profits to satisfy investors.  In other words, a privatized post office’s main goal is to make profits, not provide service to the public.

A post office may also be privatized, through the back door, by contracting out certain postal services and jobs to the private sector.

Is the public in favour of postal privatization?

No. The government’s Canada Post Corporation Strategic Review revealed that “there appears to be little to no public support for the privatisation or deregulation of Canada Post at this time, and considerable if not unanimous support for the maintenance of a quality, affordable universal service for all Canadians and communities.” 

please download the PDF for full Q & A

DEREGULATION

What does deregulating a post office mean?

Deregulation means reducing or removing a post office’s monopoly.

Post office monopoly: No post office has a true monopoly on mail.  A postal monopoly (also called a reserved service area or exclusive privilege) simply gives a post office the exclusive right to deliver certain kinds of mail. For example, Canada Post has a monopoly or exclusive privilege to deliver letters. A letter is defined as “one or more messages or information in any form, the total mass of which, if any, does not exceed 500 g, whether or not enclosed in an envelope, that is intended for collection or for transmission or delivery to any addressee as one item...” Some countries have monopolies that extend beyond letters. 

The scope of the monopoly is usually limited to some degree.  Some letter monopolies allow messengers to deliver letters that are above a certain weight.  Others allow messengers to deliver letters as long as they charge an amount that is, for example, two or more times the basic letter rate.  Some monopolies are defined by a combination of weight and price.

In Canada, anyone can deliver letters as long as they charge a fee that is three times the regular rate for letters weighing fifty grams ($3.60 as of January 7, 2015).

Is the public in favour of deregulation?

No. The government’s Canada Post Corporation Strategic Review found that: “there appears to be little to no public support for the privatisation or deregulation of Canada Post at this time, and considerable if not unanimous support for the maintenance of a quality, affordable universal service for all Canadians and communities.”

Moreover, submissions to the strategic review showed there is widespread opposition to deregulation, including the public, major postal users, many federal politicians and municipal representatives as well as groups representing seniors, rural residents, people with disabilities, labour, students and civil society.

Municipalities are especially adamant in their opposition.

Five hundred forty-three (543) of the 653 municipalities that made submissions during the strategic review of Canada Post said they opposed deregulation. Another 26 municipalities said they were concerned. Only one municipality supported deregulation.

please download the PDF for full Q & A

Postal Privatization and Deregulation - Questions and Answers

A Human Factor

Date: 
Monday December 15 2014

A member of CUPW's Sherbrooke local has created a website entitled A Human Factor. This site allows people to post their comments in support of public postal services and the CUPW campaign to Save Canada Post.

Human Factor

Human Factor

Community Mailboxes Will Hurt Residential Property Values

Date: 
Thursday September 25 2014

Postal service cuts are coming to people’s homes, and they may be wondering what the impact will be.

Canada Post intends to install and use Community Mailboxes (CMBs) where homes currently have door-to-door delivery. The plan will affect both postal workers and users, so the Canadian Union of Postal Workers (CUPW) wanted to find out how much the CMB plan could cost homeowners. Earlier this year, CUPW investigated how CMBs might affect residential property values. 

We learned there is more than one way to find whether something would influence a home’s market value.
One method is called the direct comparison approach. This approach suggests that yes, a CMB installation would probably reduce a home’s value: if you had a choice between two homes, one with and one without a CMB there, other factors being equal, it’s reasonable to think you would prefer the one without.  So you would likely pay more for that one. 

But this direct comparison approach doesn’t put a dollar figure on the impact. 

Another method, a “before and after” method of appraisal would help determine the amount of the devaluation, but this kind of data isn’t available yet, because there aren’t yet any residential properties in Canada that have had CMBs added to their property. In other words, Canada Post is in unknown territory, and no-one can accurately predict the cost.

 

Factors

Why would someone rather buy a house without a CMB – or one without a CMB right next door?

Because of: 

  • the associated increase in traffic and noise;
  • the nuisance of vehicles stopped and idling there;
  • debris and litter;
  • loss of privacy;
  • decreased curb appeal;
  • and vandalism concerns, among other possible reasons

 

CUPW has questions

Canada Post Corporation (CPC) maintains it has the right to impose its new mailboxes on people and doesn’t have to give them any choice in the matter. Representatives of CPC have met with affected residents to tell them this is how things will be. 

But they’re leaving some important questions unanswered. 

Should a residential property owner seek compensation? Are they being misled to believe they have no choice? What will they do about the costs of cleaning and maintaining the property if/when Canada Post fails to adequately maintain the CMB area? What if someone should be injured or cause other liability on a homeowner’s property? 

Canada Post’s plan makes homeowners and the public pay for the costs, while cutting services. Offering less for more isn’t a good plan. 

If you, your friends and family, or the public have questions about this issue, please ask them to go to savecanadapost.ca or call toll free 855-878-7111 to get more information and join the campaign to Save Canada Post.

In Solidarity, 

Denis Lemelin
National President

2011-2015 / Bulletin #321

Community Mailboxes Will Hurt Residential Property Values

Send your MP a message urging a public review of Canada Post

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A Better Public Postal Service For Everyone!: It's Time.